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Russian thrusters accidentally tilt International Space Station again

Russian thrusters have accidentally titled the International Space Station (ISS) for the second time this year. 

The Soyuz MS-18 was scheduled to deliver a small crew again to Earth early Sunday morning. During a deliberate pre-departure check at round 5:02 a.m. EDT, the thrusters continued to fireside past the tip of the check, leading to a “loss of attitude control.” 

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“Within 30 minutes, flight controllers regained attitude control of the space station, which is now in a stable configuration,” NASA officers wrote. “The crew was awake at the time of the event and was not in any danger.”

The lab briefly deviated from its normal orientation by 57 levels, in accordance with SPACE.com. The engines shut off on their very own, probably because of the engines working out of propellant, in accordance with NASA flight director Timothy Creamer. 

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The reason behind the deviant engine exercise stays unknown. NASA and Russia’s federal space company, Roscosmos, have opened a joint investigation into the incident. 

The small crew scheduled to fly house on Sunday included cosmonaut Oleg Novitskiy, movie director Klim Shipenko and actor Yulia Presild. The departure will proceed as deliberate. 

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An analogous incident occurred on July 29, when thrusters from a newly arrived Russian module began firing and rotated the lab by about 540 levels. Officials claimed the sooner incident was because of a software glitch. 

“The crew was never in any danger,” NASA later tweeted of the occasion. 

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The space station is presently operated by NASA astronauts Mark Vande Hei, Shane Kimbrough and Megan McArthur; Oleg Novitsky and Pyotr Dubrov of Russia’s Roscosmos space company; Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Akihiko Hoshide and European Space Agency astronaut Thomas Pesquet.

Fox News’ Michael Ruiz contributed to this report. 

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