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Epileptic tech employee, 36, shares how he lost both legs: Is now running marathon on prosthetics

A person who lost both his legs after struggling a seizure and falling onto a New York City subway platform plans to take on a 5K  impediment course and 6K race this weekend after coaching with prosthetic legs for a year. 

Roman Leykin, 36, a former tech employee from Brooklyn who was identified with epilepsy as an adolescent, was caught with a seizure whereas commuting to work in February 2018, the Stamford Advocate reported.  

The sudden assault prompted him to fall onto the subway tracks as a practice ran him over, leaving him with traumatic brain harm and his legs needing to be amputated. 

No longer in a position to do his job, Leykin has dedicated himself to the world of athletics, taking on the Gaylord Guantlet’s 5K impediment course on Saturday and the Achilles Hope & Possibility 6K on Sunday.  

‘Right now, I’m going to as many amputee occasions as I can all around the nation and fairly quickly all around the world,’ Leykin instructed the Advocate. ‘I am unable to cease.’

Roman Leykin, 36, suffered a traumatic brain injury and had both his legs amputated after being hit by a NYC subway train in 2018. Forced to leave his tech job, Leykin has moved on to master walking with his new prosthetics in a year

Roman Leykin, 36, suffered a traumatic brain harm and had both his legs amputated after being hit by a NYC subway practice in 2018. Forced to depart his tech job, Leykin has moved on to grasp strolling along with his new prosthetics in a year

Leykin taking a stroll last week with his 'tech legs'

Leykin has come a long way after intially falling with the legs when he first tried them last year

Leykin (above) is assured in his potential to stroll with the brand new prosthetics as he took on a 5K impediment course on Saturday and plans to finish a 6K race on Sunday

Leykin, who was net developer working in Manhattan, mentioned the moments after his 2018 accident had been a blur after he fell unconscious affected by the brain harm he sustained. 

He spent a year on the Burke Rehabilitation Hospital in White Plains, New York, and was utilizing a wheelchair till 2021. 

That was a giant year for Leykin, who dedicated himself to strolling with quick prosthetics. 

‘I jumped off my wheelchair and I took a pair steps and I fell instantly,’ Leykin instructed the Advocate about his first try with the ‘stubbies.’

‘I received proper again up. And I fell. And I received proper again up. And I fell. 

‘And inside quarter-hour or 20 minutes, I used to be strolling and never holding on to a single factor. Yes, I used to be shorter, however the freedom of motion gave me freedom of life.’

Documenting his progress on Instagram and TikTok, the place he has practically 200,000 followers, Leykin might be seen taking quick, awkward steps in May 2021 earlier than falling down with a smile on his face over the liberty of mobility. 

Since then, Leykin has developed to utilizing longer ‘tech legs,’ as he enjoys hikings, crusing, {golfing}, bowling, mountain climbing, hockey, snowboarding and different sports activities. 

‘I’m a really aggressive particular person. I really like sweating. So doing something that makes you sweat, I really feel nice it doesn’t matter what the exercise is,’ he mentioned. 

Leykin spent a year recovering from his accident and is now committed to training his body

Leykin spent a year recovering from his accident and is now dedicated to coaching his physique

He has taken on a plethora of different sports, including rock climbing earlier this year

He has taken on a plethora of various sports activities, together with mountain climbing earlier this year 

With his new prosthetic long legs, Leykin has also taken up cycling

With his new prosthetic lengthy legs, Leykin has additionally taken up biking 

Leykin’s newest enterprise was the chaotic Gaylord Gauntlet, a charitable impediment course race hosted by Gaylord Specialty Healthcare at their Wallingford campus. 

The 5K occasion options treks by the forest and dirt hills, hurdles over timber and partitions, and a slide right into a pool of water. Overall, the race featured 24 obstacles for Leykin and others to finish. 

Katie Joly, the Gaylord Sports Association’s program supervisor, counseled Leykin on his drive and talent to show his life round. 

‘Lots of instances for individuals it is getting that confidence again to be who they’re once more as a result of … numerous of us that we work with, they’ve had a spinal wire harm, a stroke, a traumatic brain harm, limb loss, like Rome, they usually’re studying how to stay their life in another way,’ Joly instructed the advocate.

The Gaylord Gauntlet featured 24 obstacles for Leykin and others to complete

The Gaylord Gauntlet featured 24 obstacles for Leykin and others to finish

Among the obstacles include a wall climb after a trek through mud hills

Among the obstacles embody a wall climb after a trek by mud hills 

The second to last obstacle is a slid down hill into a pit of water

The second to final impediment is a slid down hill right into a pit of water

The enjoyable however grueling course would depart most individuals too sore to maneuver the following day, however Leykin is as an alternative selecting to sort out the twentieth annual Achilles Hope & Possibility four-mile race on Sunday. 

The race, set to start within the morning in New York City’s Central Park, celebrates incapacity inclusion and permits all to hitch the occasion on the heels of the anniversary of the signing of the Americans with Disabilities Act. 

Leykin instructed the Advocate he was excited to take on the race and eager to observe his mantra, ‘Relentless ahead constructive momentum.’ 

The athlete mentioned he was at all times shifting ahead, jokingly warning others, ‘I’m not gonna get in your manner, however do not dare get in mine as a result of … you may get rolled over, you may get walked over, you may get run over.’  

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