San Diego

California bill could ban homeless camps near parks, schools

The ban is one thing native cities, like Los Angeles and Sacramento, have already accomplished.

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Homeless and housing goes to be a serious focus as this new legislative session kicks off. The new Republican chief within the State Senate, San Diego Senator Brian Jones, launched a bill that might ban homeless encampments near delicate areas like schools and parks throughout the state.

Jones wished to make it clear, whereas this bill would make it against the law to camp near these delicate areas, it’s as much as the cities in the event that they wish to take motion on it. 

“It actually does apply statewide, but it’s it’s not a mandate,” Jones stated. “It’s a law enforcement tool, a county health department tool, that they can use if they so choose to use it, but there’s nothing in the bill that would compel them to do so.”

It’s one thing native cities run by Democrats, like Los Angeles and Sacramento, have already accomplished.

“The homeless disaster will not be a partisan problem. It wasn’t brought on by Republicans or Democrats essentially. It’s not going to be solved by republicans appearing alone,” Jones said. “Actually, our bill is crafted considerably after the Los Angeles ordinance that was handed earlier within the year.”

As he was campaigning for the November election, Jones stated homeless camps was the primary problem voters wished to speak to him about. 

“This is to give counties and local jurisdictions the ability to keep at least a certain part of their community safe,” Jones said, “And I think we got to keep our children safe as they’re going to school, as they’re using public libraries, going to parks, and community centers.”

California Homeless Union Attorney Anthony Prince will not be shopping for it. 

“A political device to make it appear that as a class of people, people who are unhoused are by their nature, a dangerous threat to children, threat to property, again, the statistics don’t bear it out, and we never see the figures,” Prince said. “We hear people ‘oh, someone got mad at me. Somebody threw something at me, and they’re homeless. Therefore do we criminalize the entire population of unhoused people’, it’s no more acceptable than saying, ‘oh, an African American person committed a crime. Therefore, we need to impose specific restrictions against the African American community’.”

Prince stated it’ll do nothing to unravel the underlying problem. 

“We’re not here to say let the camps exist, let people be in the streets. That’s not what our union is about,” Prince said.  “However, until such time as the state of California and the cities and counties make the determination that they absolutely have to stop this death in the streets by providing durable safe housing, then we feel the obligation on the cities and counties is not to tear down these encampments.”

Prince will not be denying that there are camps the place felony exercise happens, however he stated those that are usually not homeless commit crimes at larger charges.

Jones agrees this received’t clear up the issue. 

“We’re not going to get one answer, and we actually have to shift our perspective about that, and anticipating there to be one answer,” Jones said. “This is only one answer to maintain a specific a part of our neighborhoods secure.”

In the bill, Jones emphasizes that any camp near these delicate areas must be given clear discover not less than three days prematurely that they’re breaking the regulation earlier than any motion will be taken. 

Prince will not be denying that there are camps the place felony exercise happens. But he stated those that are usually not homeless commit crimes at larger charges. 

In the bill, Jones emphasised that any camp near these delicate areas must be given clear discover not less than three days prematurely that they’re breaking the regulation earlier than any motion will be taken. 

WATCH RELATED: San Diego on forefront of launching first-in-the-nation Care Court program (Dec. 2022).

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